Frequently Asked Questions about Counseling Services

A: No. Counseling is free to all students who are enrolled as full-time students.

A: We are open Monday-Friday, 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. The last scheduled appointment of the day for each counselor is 4:00 PM. We are closed on weekends and during all breaks where classes are not in session.

A: As licensed mental health professionals, we are qualified to diagnose and treat all mental, emotional, or behavioral disorders. Issues we provide treatment for include the following:

  • depression
  • anxiety
  • Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
  • Bipolar disorder
  • grief and loss issues
  • relationships problems
  • couples counseling (dating, engaged, or married)
  • healing from abuse
  • trauma
  • family issues
  • sexuality concerns, such as pornography, sexual addiction, and other related concerns
  • eating disorders
  • addictions
  • ADHD

In addition to these issues, we help students work on stress management strategies, overcoming anger issues, setting boundaries, resolving roommate conflicts, and more. In short, there is no issue too big or small for which to come to counseling.

A: We provide individual counseling, couples counseling, and group counseling. We can also speak at unit or hall meetings as desired or meet with an individual on a one-time basis.

A: We can help you address any problems that you are having academically or with your career goals that are impacting your mental or emotional health. However, if you are not experiencing emotional or mental difficulties as a result of these concerns, we encourage you to contact the appropriate department.

For academic concerns, please visit Academic Enrichment (The Cove). You can learn more about The Cove by clicking here.

For help with exploring future career interests or finding employment, please visit Career Services. You can read more about Career Services by clicking here.

A: No. Unless you sign a Release of Information authorizing us to share information with a named individual, your information is confidential. There are rare situations in which confidentiality has to be broken. Please read more about that in the question that follows.

A: Yes, there are times when our counselors have to break confidentiality. These include:

  • If you are a risk to your own life or the life of someone else.
  • If a minor or mentally challenged adult is being abused.
  • If we are subpoenaed by a judge to release your records.

A: You are welcome to request to see a specific counselor or a counselor of a certain gender. Keep in mind that doing so may increase the time you wait for an appointment, but we do our best to honor those requests.

A: Each counselor and student will work together to determine how many sessions are needed to address the student's concerns. Our goals are to help each student address his or her concerns thoroughly and to ensure that all students can be seen as quickly as possible when they come to us for help.

A: Definitely. We make sure that a student’s scheduled appointment does not conflict with classes, work, internships, clinical experiences, student teaching, etc.

  1. The first step in making an appointment is to complete the Disclosure, Consent, and Intake form. You may obtain this by communicating with our administrative assistant, whose contact information can be found here. You may also retrieve the form by clicking here. Once we receive your completed form, our administrative assistant will work with you to schedule you to see one of our counselors. It is at this time that you should make any requests about the gender of your counselor or seeing a certain counselor.
  2. If there is a waiting list of students who are waiting to be scheduled to meet with a counselor, your name will be added to that list, and you will be contacted when an opening becomes available.
  3. When you have been scheduled for your first appointment, our administrative assistant will give you the name of your counselor and provide you with the date/time of your first appointment. If any changes need to be made, please contact our administrative assistant.

A: When you see your counselor the first time, you will coordinate with him or her directly to schedule subsequent sessions. Our counselors attempt to meet with a student at the same time each week in order to ensure that it is as easy as possible to work counseling appointments into the student’s schedule.

A: The wait to see a counselor varies considerably throughout the year. Typically, it is easiest to get an appointment with a counselor at the start of the school year or at the start of the spring semester. There are times throughout the year where students do have to wait a few weeks before being seen, but our staff makes every attempt to ensure that students are seen as quickly as possible. We understand that seeking out counseling can produce anxiety, and students often feel as if they need immediate help. As a result, we do our best to offer students the help they seek as quickly as we can. If you have any concerns about your wait to see a counselor, you are welcome to call our office or send us an email by clicking here.

A: Being willing to see the first counselor with an opening, regardless of the counselor's gender, will likely expedite the process of getting an appointment. Additionally, taking the first available opening that does not conflict with classes or work/internship/clinicals, even if it is not your preferred appointment time, will likely decrease the time you wait for your first appointment.

A: During your first counseling appointment, you will meet with your counselor and discuss the reasons that brought you to counseling. This is why completing the Disclosure, Consent, and Intake form ahead of time is beneficial to you. By taking approximately 15 minutes before your first session to read and complete this form, much more of that first session can be spent on discussing the problems you are experiencing and beginning to work together on identifying your goals for counseling. Feel free to ask any questions you may have about your counselor’s experience, how counseling works, etc. Before the end of the first session, your counselor will discuss with you the benefit of additional sessions, and if you mutually agree that they are needed, he or she will work will confirm the day and time of future sessions.

A: We understand that many students struggle with issues that are prohibited by the student handbook. However, Cedarville University recognizes that students need access to support, help, and accountability as they work to overcome problems that may violate student life policies. As such, students are not “turned in” if they are struggling with behaviors that are in opposition to the lifestyle and behaviors that they agreed to follow when they came to Cedarville. Our counselors do encourage students to be honest with faculty and staff as appropriate/needed about challenges they are having, and coming to counseling does not negate any consequences a student may receive if they are engaging in behaviors that are not permitted in the Student Handbook. We believe that honesty and accountability are helpful aspects of our lives as believers in Jesus Christ, but we cannot require students to self-report any issues that may violate the student handbook. If a student makes a choice not to do so, counseling is still available and confidential (except in the cases noted above). Finally, we are happy to provide support in any way we can if you decide to share your struggle with your RD or one of the Deans.

A: Your counseling experience should be a time for you to work on the issues that are affecting your life and creating difficulties. Though all of our counselors are Christians and believe in the power and importance of drawing on the strength of the Lord and using His Word to bring healing and change, we respect the rights of each student to determine how much he or she wants to bring a spiritual focus to counseling. You will not be pressured to address matters of faith if you do not want to do so.

A: Our counselors do diagnose and treat mental, emotional, or behavioral disorders like depression, anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, eating disorders, and more. If we think medication is beneficial, we will encourage you to make an appointment with University Medical Services (UMS) or the primary care physician of your choice to discuss the risks and benefits of taking medication to help relieve your symptoms. Our stance is that the use of prescribed medication to combat the complications that arise from a mental or emotional disorder does not conflict with the Christian faith. However, we understand and respect that the use of medication is a personal choice and do not require students to take medication in a majority of cases.

For more information about University Medical Services, you can click here.

A: Our counselors do diagnose and treat mental, emotional, or behavioral disorders like depression, anxiety, Bipolar Disorder, eating disorders, and more. If we think medication is beneficial, we will encourage you to make an appointment with University Medical Services (UMS) or the primary care physician of your choice to discuss the risks and benefits of taking medication to help relieve your symptoms. Our stance is that the use of prescribed medication to combat the complications that arise from a mental or emotional disorder does not conflict with the Christian faith. However, we understand and respect that the use of medication is a personal choice and do not require students to take medication in a majority of cases.

Occasional cancellations are understandable and will not impact a student’s ability to continue to receive services. However, if you begin to frequently cancel or miss scheduled appointments without notifying our office beforehand, your counselor will speak with you about this pattern. You and your counselor may need to reevaluate your session frequency or find an alternate time to meet (if possible). Note that failure to attend two consecutive, scheduled sessions will likely lead to forfeiture of your spot on your counselor’s schedule.

A:If you are feeling suicidal and do not feel confident that you can keep yourself safe, you should immediately inform your RA, RD, or call 911.

A: We have provided information on a variety of topics related to mental, emotional, and behavioral health in the Resources page of our website. You can may access them here. Additionally, the link to our Self-Care Recommendations may be helpful to you while you wait for an appointment or if you are unsure if you want/need to be seen by a counselor. You can find that on our Resources page as well.