For the word of God and the testimony of Jesus Christ

"Tortoise" Wins Engineering Race for Cedarville University

Share This:

"Tortoise" Wins Engineering Race for Cedarville University

A Cedarville University engineering team recently proved that the Tortoise truly can win the race. The Tortoise, a battery-powered miniature vehicle designed and built by the team, maneuvered a track in top time to earn first place at the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Fourth Annual Model Design Competition in Montreal. The team was featured in the November 2002 "ASEE Prism" magazine. Holding the car is team member Tim Linden. Other team members (L-R) are Dave Bartlett, Michael Walker, Silas Gibbs, and Dr. Clint Kohl (advisor).

by Public Relations Office

November 27, 2002

Cedarville, Ohio—A Cedarville University engineering team recently proved that the Tortoise truly can win the race. The Reliable Tortoise, a battery-powered miniature vehicle designed and built by the team, won first place at the American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Fourth Annual Model Design Competition in Montreal. It was the second year in a row that Cedarville has taken first place at the competition. Participating teams build their own battery-powered vehicles under size limitations of 5 by 7 by 15 inches and a cost ceiling of $300. Without any kind of remote control, each vehicle must try to be the fastest at navigating a maze-like track. The Tortoise made the fastest time by simply driving over the maze`s barriers. The vehicle defeated cars from eight other schools, including Illinois Central College and Purdue University. Cedarville`s team was pictured in the November 2002 issue of "ASEE Prism" magazine (Vol. 12 No. 3). Team members were Michael Walker (junior mechanical engineering major from Manchester, Mo.), Dave Bartlett (sophomore mechanical engineering major from West Creek, N.J.), Silas Gibbs (senior electrical engineering major from Galloway, Ohio), and Tim Linden (sophomore computer engineering major from Phoenix, Ariz.). The team was advised by Dr. Clint Kohl, associate professor of electrical engineering. -30-