CU Grads Intern at White House

CU Grads Intern at White House

by Public Relations Office - Cedarville, OH

October 6, 2006

The White House had 100 summer internship openings in 2006, and Cedarville University alumni snagged two of them. One of the interns, Cameron Arch ’06, shared with Cedarville University regarding his White House experience and his new position in the U.S. Trade and Development Agency.

CU: How did you find out about the White House internship openings?

Cameron: Cedarville career services helped by providing me with contacts of former students who also interned at the White House. Ultimately, I applied after hearing the incredible stories of those Cedarville alums.

CU: What did your summer job entail?

C: I worked in the Office of Strategic Initiatives, helping research information for the directors in order to better promote the president’s agenda. The office acts as a think-tank for the White House and is one of Karl Rove’s four offices. The White House internship Web site states: “The Office of Strategic Initiatives plans, develops, and coordinates a long-range strategy for achieving Presidential priorities. The office conducts research and assists in message development.”

CU: What it was like to work at the White House?

C: I’ve never met more humble people than those working in the Bush administration and at the White House. … The ones who choose to serve this president remain very positive and display a willingness to help the country. Their desire to serve America and its citizens is very apparent. I gained an entirely new perspective by working in the Bush White House and wish everyone could see the genuine compassion and caring attitude of President Bush and his staff.

CU: What does your new role in the U.S. Trade and Development Agency entail?
C: I’m now serving as special assistant to the director of the U.S. Trade and Development Agency. I do everything from speechwriting to coordinating travel and helping to facilitate the agency’s mission: to advance economic development and U.S. commercial interests in developing and middle-income countries.