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Off to Kyrgyzstan

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Off to Kyrgyzstan

Photo credit: Scott L. Huck/Cedarville University

by Public Relations Office - Cedarville, OH

October 2, 2006

Cedarville University’s Dr. Andrew Wiseman has been selected as a Senior Fellow for the U.S. State Department. He will be based at the U.S. Embassy in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan, for the 2006-2007 academic year.

In addition to teaching and conducting research, Andrew will be working with U.S. and central Asian officials to evaluate and develop higher education language programs in Kyrgyzstan and central Asia. Kyrgyzstan is a landlocked country bordering Kazakhstan, China, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan. Following the breakup of the Soviet Union, Kyrgyzstan achieved independence in 1991 and the capital, where Andrew will be based, was renamed Bishkek.

Andrew serves as an assistant professor of Spanish and director of travel studies. While in Kyrgyzstan he plans to explore international study options and development programs. “As director of travel studies, I’m always looking for new exchanges/study abroad opportunities for our students,” he explained. To facilitate those efforts, Andrew will return to the University the first week of each semester to conduct orientations and on-campus interviews for students wanting to study overseas. Along with that, Andrew will teach one of his classes through WebCT.

The idea for applying for the fellowship came last year after Andrew returned from Uzbekistan on a Fulbright Award. While there he acquired a passion to connect with the Muslim culture. “I want to create professional and personal relationships and help make a difference in the lives of others,” Andrew explained. “So, based on the support I have received from Cedarville for my international academic endeavors last fall, on a whim I applied for a post with the U.S. Department of State in central Asia.” Besides engaging the culture, Andrew is looking forward to the opportunities he will have to help shape education policy in central Asia.