Philanthropic Engineering Students Win Awards

Philanthropic Engineering Students Win Awards

Three Cedarville University engineering students won awards at the recent District B Regional Student Development Conference held at Wright State University, sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Photo credit: Scott L. Huck / Cedarville University

by Public Relations Office—Cedarville, Ohio

April 30, 2009

Cedarville, Ohio—Most senior projects involve lengthy papers, large-scale experiments, or practicums like student teaching. However, Cedarville University’s engineering program encourages philanthropic projects and communication skills.

Three CU students recently won awards for their senior project presentations at the recent District B Regional Student Development Conference held at Wright State University, sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). Approximately 25 schools were represented at the competition, including notable engineering schools such as Michigan State University, Penn State University, and the University of Toronto.

Senior Matt Hollis won first place for his oral presentation about re-engineering a fracture fixation device requested by missionary physicians in Kenya, Africa. Hollis’ win entitles him to a fully funded trip to the International Mechanical Engineering Congress to compete against winners from across the nation.

Mordecai Veldt, a senior, also won first place for his website detailing his team’s project of designing solar lights to help Liberian pastors in remote villages.

Senior Ryan Samuelsen placed second for his oral presentation about developing contra-rotating propeller drives for solar boats.

As these seniors prepare for life after graduation, Cedarville University is proud to have developed the next generation of engineers who have a heart for helping those in need.