Social Work Majors Fight Local Hunger

Dine Out for Hunger

By dining out at participating restaurants, the community members can raise money for Yellow Springs Food Pantry and combat hunger as part of the Cedarville University Department of Social Work's Dine Out for Hunger event.

by Bethany Brock, Public Relations Writer

November 11, 2012

As a creative way to help combat hunger and homelessness in surrounding areas, the social work department at Cedarville University is sponsoring the weeklong Dine Out for Hunger event on Nov. 12-16.

Dine Out for Hunger supports local businesses and gives them a way to give back to the community, said Julie Furj-Kuhn, assistant professor of social work. Throughout the week, local restaurants have agreed to donate a percentage of their sales to a nonprofit organization that serves the hungry. The nonprofit being supported this year is the Yellow Springs Food Pantry, located in Yellow Springs, Ohio. Mary Ann Bebko opened the pantry at the Yellow Springs United Methodist Church five years ago and is now overseen by Patty McAllister. Anyone can contribute by dining at one of the participating restaurants during the specific days and times.

“It give students, faculty, staff and the surrounding community a tangible way to support efforts of combating hunger in the local community, and it benefits those organizations that deal directly with hunger and homelessness who at times, live day to day in order to provide for their clients and community,” said Furj-Kuhn.

Local eateries have been a tremendous help in making past Dine Out for Hunger events a success.  Furj-Kuhn said that participating restaurants often tell her that they consider it a blessing to give back to the community in this way. 

Participating restaurants include Beans -N- Cream, Subway, Colonial Pizza, Stoney Creek Roasters, Neapolitan Ice Cream, Mom and Dad's Dairy Bar, Main Street Station and Corner Bakery. All participating restaurants are located in Cedarville, Ohio.

Furj-Kuhn said that this program started as a conversation with a former student about ways to solve the problem of hunger in local areas. “This program is at the heart of social work---helping those in need, supporting community, bringing awareness to important social issues and loving on people as Christ did,” said Kuhn.

Located in southwest Ohio, Cedarville University attracts 3,400 undergraduate, graduate and online students to more than 100 areas of study. Celebrating 125 years of inspiring greatness, Cedarville is a Christ-centered learning community recognized nationally for rigorous academic programs, strong graduation and retention rates, accredited professional and health science offerings and leading student satisfaction ratings. Visit the University online at www.cedarville.edu.