Social Work Program Offers Global Experience

Rachel Yutzy, a junior social work student, interned in Uganda during the fall 2012 semester and learned how social work can be applied universally.

Students in the department of social work have the opportunity to take classes abroad while benefiting from internships around the world. Rachel Yutzy, a junior social work student, interned in Uganda during the fall 2012 semester and learned how social work can be applied universally. Photo courtesy of Rachel Yutzy.

by Bethany Brock, Public Relations Writer

December 10, 2012

Students in the social work department can further their education beyond the classroom by working internationally for a semester during their junior or senior year.  

Julie Furj-Kuhn, M.S.W., assistant professor of social work, said the internship experience offered by the department of social work is a unique opportunity for students to see how the social work profession operates in foreign countries. This experience allows students to take a series of classes internationally while benefiting from internships with various organizations around the world. 

Furj-Kuhn said this opportunity is often life changing for students as they are able to gain social work experience and learn about social justice issues in a cross-cultural context.

“Social work students have a once in a lifetime opportunity to live side-by-side with someone whose culture can be very different from their own. The life knowledge and social work skill set gained from that experience cannot be found in a classroom,” Furj-Kuhn said. 

Rachel Yutzy, a junior social work major from Milford, Del., is currently taking classes at Uganda Christian University in Mukono, Uganda, while interning at the Compassion International Seeta Child Development Center.

While living in Uganda, Yutzy has gained a deeper understanding of international social work practices.  “Living here and working here has changed my view of the world. I feel like my horizons have been broadened,” she said. 

By interning abroad, Yutzy said she has learned more about the social work field than she would have by interning in the United States.  “I have learned things I would have never learned in my own context ,” Yutzy said.

Located in southwest Ohio, Cedarville University attracts 3,400 undergraduate, graduate and online students to more than 100 areas of study. Celebrating 125 years of inspiring greatness, Cedarville is a Christ-centered learning community recognized nationally for rigorous academic programs, strong graduation and retention rates, accredited professional and health science offerings and leading student satisfaction ratings. Visit the University online at www.cedarville.edu.