Testicular Cancer

About Testicular Cancer
Symptoms
Treatment
Questions


Testicular Cancer
Testicular Cancer, or cancer of the testes, occurs most commonly in men 15 to 34 years of age, and accounts for 3% of all cancer deaths in this age group.
Those at risk are men whose mothers took diethylstilbesterol (DES) during pregnancy, men who have an undescended or partially descended testicle, or men whose testes have failed to descend into the scrotum. More information.

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Symptoms

The symptoms of testicular cancer are a slight enlargement of one testicle, a change inconsistency, occasional pain in the lower abdomen or groin, or a sensation of heaviness in the groin or testicles.


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Treatment

Cancer of the testicle is a very treatable form of cancer if detected in the early stages. Treatment may include surgical removal of the affected testicle, and possibly radiation and/or chemotherapy to prevent the spread of cancer to other body parts.
The best hope for early detection of testicular cancer is a three minute monthly self-examination.

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Questions

E-mail UMS or call UMS by dialing the extension # 7863, or just call 937-766-7863 from your cell phone to speak to a nurse or physician. A picture brochure on how to perform a testicular self-exam is available at University Medical Services. Call or e-mail to request a confidential copy via campus mail.

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