University Color Guide

Marketing

The Cedarville color palette consists of a primary and secondary color palette.

The consistent use of these colors will create recognition and strengthen the identity. The Cedarville logos must always use the primary color palette.

Which color model should I use? View the university website color palette

Primary Color Palette

Primary Color Palette

Secondary Color Palette

Secondary Color Palette

Primary Tints

Primary Tints

Which color model should I use?

Spot (Pantone) — This color model is used to specify and print colors in which each color is printed with its own ink. The University letterhead is a good example. Pantone 2955 (blue) and 130 (gold) are the only inks used. T-shirts are also a common example. Each color printed on the shirt uses a different color ink identified by a Pantone number.

The biggest benefit of using spot colors is color consistency. Since inks are being mixed to create the color, there will be no variation throughout a print run. Another benefit is cost savings. Reducing the number of colors will reduce overall costs.

Process (CMYK) — This color model is used when printing with four inks or toner (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black) to produce other colors. While industrial offset presses use this method to print large quantities of brochures and magazines, this is also the method used by color copiers and printers.

Screen (RGB) — Your computer monitor displays graphics by mixing red, green, and blue light. Light and ink mix differently, so for any color being used on screen for a website, PowerPoint, video, screen saver, etc. should use RGB color values.

The largest benefit of this color model is that there are significantly more colors available. Have you ever noticed how photos are always more colorfull and vibrant on your computer screen than when they are printed out? Avoid using RGB colors when printing because many of the bright colors will shift when printed using cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks.