Ken Ham Writes on Passing Along a Biblical Worldview to the Next Generation

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Ken Ham Writes on Passing Along a Biblical Worldview to the Next Generation

November 19, 2012

In today's Parent Prep post, guest contributor, Ken Ham, President of Answers in Genesis and the Creation Museum, shares from his unique interaction with an Australian aboriginal elder about the importance of passing along a biblical worldview to the next generation.


"My people are destroyed for lack of knowledge" (Hosea 4:6).

As an Australian (now living near Cincinnati, Ohio), growing up “down under” offered some unique experiences, including the time I once talked to an old Australian aboriginal elder. This aborigine recalled roaming the deserts with his family many years ago when they were in their tribal state. This old man had since become a Christian. He remembered that as a little boy -- bound in this spiritist, anti-God culture -- he asked his father one day: "What is God like, Father?" He said his father turned to him, and then after a long pause said: "I don't know, Son. We've forgotten."

This aborigine’s father had forgotten because the fathers of previous generations had forgotten. Their ancestors had known the answer, but somewhere throughout their ancestry, a father had not passed on the truth about the God of creation to the next generation.

Many passages in the Bible command parents to teach their children so that the correct information is passed on to, and implemented by, the next generation (e.g., Isaiah 38:19; Ephesians 6:4).

As I pondered my conversation with the Australian aboriginal, I realized that this same problem is being reflected not only within Christian families here in America, but also in Christian education as a whole. As I have had the opportunity to speak in hundreds of churches and dozens of schools in America, I have noticed that the coming generations do not have enough knowledge to defend the basics of their faith.

Also, from my experience in reviewing various Christian textbooks and visiting some Christian schools, here is what I have largely discovered (with some happy exceptions): schools will basically take a secular way of thinking and just stamp God’s Word on it. In other words, they merely put a few Bible verses in the textbooks and then claim to be a Christ-centered education. And yet we wonder why our young people don’t have a Christian worldview?

As you consider Christian college options, ask questions about how they teach on creation. You may be surprised. I thank God that Cedarville University takes a stand on the authority of the Bible from its very first verse.


Ken Ham, originally from Australia, obtained a bachelor’s degree in applied science from Queensland Institute of Technology, as well as a diploma in education from the University of Queensland. Ham holds four doctorates as well: a Doctor of Divinity (Temple Baptist College), Doctor of Literature (Liberty University), Doctor of Letters (Tennessee Temple University), and a Doctorate of Human Letters (Mid-Continent University). He is the president and founder of Answers in Genesis as well as the Creation Museum in Cincinnati, Ohio. He is the author of many books on Genesis, and travels often to speak to children, adults, and schools on several topics regarding Genesis, creation, and a biblical worldview. Visit Ken's blog!

Posted in Why Christ Centered Higher Education?