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7 Email Tips for College Now High School Students (and the Rest of Us!)

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7 Email Tips for College Now High School Students (and the Rest of Us!)

November 23, 2015

email

Getting accepted into Cedarville’s College Now program (college courses for high school students) is based on a student’s high school transcript, standardized test scores, and a church leader recommendation. But that is just the beginning. 

Achieving success in a College Now course requires competency in several areas other than academic preparedness. These skills are often referred to as "soft skills," and one of the most important is the ability to write an effective email. This is crucial when communicating with a professor.

Here are seven tips that will help your student as he or she communicates with professors via email:

  1. Subject line. Choose a few words that accurately summarize the content of the email. Leaving the subject line blank may get no response at all as it can indicate spam. 
  2. Greeting. Use an appropriate greeting such as “Dear Professor Smith” before launching into the topic.
  3. Identify yourself. The opening line should include the student’s full name, the course name, and the section number. College professors likely have hundreds of students and may respond to tens of emails daily, especially when teaching an online course.
  4. Main message. The message should be concise and clear. Deal with one subject per email, use bullet points to clarify if necessary, and clearly state the response desired from the professor. 
  5. Express appreciation. Thank the professor for his or her time and attention to your request.
  6. Closing. Use an appropriate closing such as “Kind regards, John Jones.”
  7. Proofread. Proofread for spelling, grammar, punctuation, brevity, and tone. Write out texting abbreviations. Read the email out loud to be certain the tone is respectful. Imagine reading this email directly to the professor and change any words or phrases that would be inappropriate in that setting. Make sure there is a clear and concise request to which the professor can respond.

Writing effective email is important in any setting – from the college classroom to the corporate office. College Now students who cultivate this skill will experience greater success in communicating with their professors, and the feedback they receive will be much more helpful. 

Posted in College Now