Collins 21   |   Tel. x7936   |   macht@cedarville.edu

Dr. Thomas Mach

Professor of History

Classes

HIST-1110 US History I

Analysis of the development of the United States from the colonial period to 1865. Attention is given to the dominant Christian influences that have tended to mold the philosophy and ideology of our cultural, social, and political development.

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HIST-1120 US History II

Analysis of the development of the United States from 1865 to the present. Attention is given to the dominant Christian influences that have tended to mold the philosophy and ideology of our cultural, social, and political development.

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HIST-2000 Intro to History

An introduction to the field of History as it pertains to both the academic and the public historian. Emphasis will be given to historical inquiry, source evaluation, analysis and synthesis, research methodology, formal historical writing, and career opportunities. Introduction to History should be taken in the sophomore year and is for majors and minors only.

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HIST-3120 Recent Contemporary America

Intensive study of the domestic and foreign policies of the United States since 1945 (with a quick look at World War II!). Particular emphasis is given to American society in the 1950s, the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement, the cultural revolution of the 1960s, American involvement in Vietnam, the Welfare State, Watergate, and the Reagan Revolution. Students interested in this course should have taken HIST-1120 as prerequisite.

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HIST-4700 Research in American History

This course comprises the capstone experience required of all History majors. It may also be selected as the capstone for the History and Political Science major and as an elective within the History minor. Each student will prepare and present a formal monograph. This course is for majors and minors only..

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HIST-3310 Total War

Study of World War One through World War Two with an emphasis on American involvement in those two conflicts.  The course will examine the concept of Total War, the influence that such a conflict has had on the societies involved, the resulting decline of the Western ideal of progress, and the impact of this era of conflict on the rest of the twentieth century.  Particular attention will be given to the causes of war, the cultural impact of war, the heroism of war, the morality of war, the politics of war, and the strategies of war. This course is co-taught by Dr. Mach and Dr. Mark Caleb Smith. NOTE: This course is planned as a study abroad course in Europe for May term 2011.

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