Writing Center Helps Students Write Well, Think Well

by Brandon Best, Public Relations Writer

When students write better, they begin to think better, too. Through Cedarville University’s Writing Center, students can take advantage of a number of different programs designed to help improve their writing skills.

Through tutoring, print and multimedia resources and writing workshops, the Writing Center is de-signed to help students write high-level content that improves grades and gives them an advantage when entering the workforce.

Founded in 2002, the Writing Center has a staff that helps students develop ideas, plan outlines and write drafts for assignments, and provides a unique peer tutoring system that allows students to work together and help each other improve.



The peer tutoring system is especially useful for English majors, many of whom will pursue a career in teaching upon graduation. By assisting other students with their writing, tutors are able to refine their teaching skills and develop a knowledge base for their future careers.

Students can schedule up to two tutoring sessions a week in the Writing Center. Students who live off campus or study through one of Cedarville’s online programs are able to schedule video chat appoint-ments to help meet their needs.

Recently, the Writing Center was awarded a Stage 3 certificate from the College Reading and Learning association, allowing it to certify tutor candidates each year through 2021.

The Writing Center also produces a podcast to help students understand writing from a professor’s prospective. Isaac Mayeux, assistant professor of English and assistant director of the Writing Center, hosts “Fill in the Blank,” a podcast dedicated to helping students understand the writing process. 

On the show, produced periodically, Mayeux interviews professors and professional writers to get their tips and tricks on writing from an educator’s perspective.

Another program that the Writing Center has introduced is called “Read to Write,” which provides stu-dents with five books a month to read. Julie Moore, associate professor of literature and director of the Writing Center, noted that the more students read, the easier they will find their writing voice.

“We want all writers to learn how to share their voice with others,” said Moore. “As we help writers discover meaning and make interdisciplinary connections, we help them communicate effectively to readers who need to hear what they have to say.”

Located in southwest Ohio, Cedarville University is an accredited, Christ-centered, Baptist institution with an enrollment of 3,711 undergraduate, graduate, and online students in more than 100 areas of study. Founded in 1887, Cedarville is recognized nationally for its authentic Christian community, rigorous academic programs, strong graduation and retention rates, accredited professional and health science offerings, and leading student satisfaction ratings. For more information about the University, visit www.cedarville.edu.