Cedarville University

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  • Overview
  • Standard 1
  • Standard 2
  • Standard 3
  • Standard 4
  • Standard 5
  • Standard 6
  • Conceptual Framework
  • Exhibits

Standard 3 - Field & Clinical Practice

3b - Design, Implementation, and Evaluation

1. Please complete the following table (Table 7) to identify the field experiences and clinical practice required for each program or categories of programs (e.g., secondary) at both the initial teacher preparation and advanced preparation levels, including graduate programs for licensed teachers.

Table 7
Field Experiences and Clinical Practice by Program
Programs Field Experiences Clinical Practice (Student Teaching or Internship) Total Number of Hours
Adolescent/Young-Adult, 7-12 Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans as well as content focused individual lesson plans. Special concentration on writing in the content area, working with those with reading difficulties, methodology in one content area, adolescent development and psychology. Experience includes diversity of grade level and school demographics. Total: 190- 215 hoursA 65 day (2 week initial involvement and 10 weeks full time) experience in a single 7-12 classroom aligned with the content area of the teacher candidate. Total: 390 hours 580 – 605 Hours
Early Childhood, pK-3 Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans as well as content focused individual lesson plans. Experience includes diversity of grade level and schooldemographics Total: 271 hours A 65 day (2 week initial involvement and 10 weeks full time) experience in a pk-3 classroom aligned with the content areas of the teachercandidate. Total: 390 hours 661 hours
Early Childhood, pK-3/ Intervention Specialist:Mild/Moderate, K-12 Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans in the areas of both early childhood and intervention specialist. Experience includes diversity of grade level and school demographics. Total 271 hours A 16 week (two 8 week full day experiences) in an early childhood (pk-3) as well as an intervention specialist (K-12) setting. Each setting ranges between 35-40 days with total experience of 78 days. Total: 468 Hours 739 Hours
Multi-Age Spanish Education, K-12 Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans. Special concentration on language development, and content methods. Experience includes diversity of grade level and school demographics. Total 190- 215 hours A 65 day (2 week initial involvement and 10 weeks full time) experience in a k-12 classroom aligned with the Spanish content area of the teacher candidate. Total: 390 hours 580 - 605 Hours
Middle Childhood, 4-9 Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans as well as content focused individual lesson plans. Special concentration on language development, middle school students, content methods, and working with children with special needs. Also includes experiences with special education students at the middle level. Experience includes diversity of grade level and school demographics. Total 271 hours A 65 day (2 week initial involvement and 10 weeks full time) experience in two specific content concentrations grades 4- 9 aligned with the content area of the teacher candidate’s concentrations .Placements will be divided so that each content area receives equitable importance. Total: 390 hour 661 Hours
Multi-Age Music Education, K-12 Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans as well as content focused individual lesson plans. Experience includes diversity of grade level and school demographics. Total 190- 215 hours A 65 day (2 week initial involvement and 10 weeks full time) experience in a pk-3 classroom aligned with the content areas of the teacher candidate. Total: 390 hours 580 - 605 Hours
Multi-Age Physical Education, K- 12 Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans as well as content focused individual lesson plans. . Experience includes diversity of grade level and school demographics (i.e. Special Populations). Total 190 hours A 65 day (2 week initial involvement and 10 weeks full time) experience in a k-12 classroom aligned with the Physical Education/Health content area of the teacher candidate. Total: 390 hours 580 Hours
Middle Childhood, 4-9/ Intervention Specialist:Mild/Moderate, K-12 Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans in the two content areas as well as an intervention specialist. Experience includes diversity of grade level and school demographics. Total 318 hours A 16 week (two 8 week full day experiences) in a middle childhood (4-9) setting as well as an intervention specialist (K-12) setting. Each setting ranges between 35-40 days with total experience of 78 days. Total: 468 786 Hours
Intervention Specialist: Mild/Moderate, K-12 Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans in the area of intervention specialist. Experience includes diversity of grade level and school demographics. Total 271 hours A 65 day (2 week initial involvement and 10 weeks full time) experience in a k-12 resources room as well as an inclusion classroom aligned with the content area of the teacher candidate. Total: 390 hours 661 Hours
M.Ed. non-licensure Multiple practicum experiences, ranging from one-on-one tutoring to the planning, execution, and assessment of full unit lesson plans. These activities are embedded in specific M.Ed. courses and conducted in the inservice teacher's p-12 classroom 200 hours over the course of the M.Ed. program that are connected to 5 M.Ed. courses. 200 Hours

2. How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates develop proficiencies outlined in the unit's conceptual framework, state standards, and professional standards through field and clinical experiences in initial and advanced preparation programs?

Evaluation of candidates’ performance in all field-based experiences is linked directly and embedded in each education course to the fifteen candidate proficiency outcomes derived from the unit’s conceptual framework which, in turn, are aligned with national and Ohio’s Standards for Teachers and with individual SPA standards. Cooperating teachers are provided a brochure, which outlines the unit’s conceptual framework, with their packet of materials. During the orientation sessions, our vision is shared with teachers, and our expectations communicated. To assist in the understanding and use of each, the syllabi and the field assessment forms are linked for review.

The M.Ed. program has identified the following 5 courses that have zero credit clinical/field experiences connected to the course:

EDU 6050 Applied Learning Theory
EDU 6200 Models of Teaching
EDU 6250 Statistical Reasoning
EDU 6400 Intervention Strategies
EDU 6700 Advanced Media and Technology

Advanced candidates will be expected to complete course assignments in these courses that will further develop proficiencies that our outlined in the M.Ed. conceptual framework, and professional standards. Advanced candidates are required to do action research in P-12 classrooms. These assignments will be assessed by the M.Ed. course professor through the zero credit clinical/field course attached to the course.

Syllabi for all of the M.Ed. courses including clinical/field experiences are available in the virtual resource room.

3. How does the unit systematically ensure that candidates use technology as an instructional tool during field experiences and clinical practice?

The teacher education program at Cedarville University places high technological expectations on its candidates. The assumption is that program completers will be well able to use educational technology in a wide variety of settings with great precision and innovation. During field and clinical experiences, students are evaluated on their competence in integrating technology into their classrooms. The use of technology is vital to instruction and thus is encouraged early in the candidate’s development and assessed often. The skills that are developed during the Technology in the Classroom course are expected to be utilized during both field and clinical experiences. The candidates use of technology is included in the programs assessment tools at all levels. Proficiency in technology is also required and assessed in both field (Program Portfolio) and clinical (Interview Portfolio) experiences. Student proficiency the use of technology can be seen in the Teacher Education Assessment Information on CedarInfo. Additional technology data is provided in 3b.8.

The M.Ed. candidate is required to complete a graduate level course entitled Advanced Media and Technology. This course also has a clinical/field experience connected to it which will provide the M.Ed. candidate the opportunity to demonstrate their competence in the use of technology in the classroom. In addition M.Ed. candidates will be expected to use technology in completing clinical/field experiences in the other four identified M.Ed. courses.

4. What criteria are used in the selection of school-based clinical faculty? How are the criteria implemented? What evidence suggests that school-based clinical faculty members are accomplished school professionals?

The selection of school-based clinical faculty is vital to the preparation of the interns/teacher candidates. All school-based clinical faculty for clinical practice must have at least three years of teaching, one year at the current grade level/subject, be licensed in the subject/grade level they are teaching, and come highly recommended by her/his principal or building administrator. School-based clinical faculty for field experiences must meet all of the criteria that are required for clinical use except for the three year aspect. If a principal recommends that a teacher new to his/her building is well qualified, field experience coordinators are permitted to assign a candidate to them. This criterion is communicated by the Director of Student Teaching when collaborating with the building administrator for arrangement of placements. For clinical practice, each school-based clinical faculty is required to complete a Cooperating Teacher Information Card which indicates current credentials and experience as a professional educator. During field experience coordination, each building administrator signs his/her name to confirm that each school-based clinical faculty meets the given criteria. A table of school-based clinical faculty members used by the undergraduate program's field experiences and clinicals, along with their qualifications is attached in 3b.8.

The clinical supervision of licensed teachers completing the M.Ed. program will be provided by the M.Ed. professor who teaches one of the 5 M.Ed. courses that have clinical/field experiences. The clinical/field experiences associated with our M.Ed. program will be a part of action research completed by advanced students in p-12 classrooms. Those M.Ed. candidates who are not currently teaching will be expected to complete action research in a P-12 school where they can complete the specified M.Ed. course assignment. Supervision and evaluation of the action research will be provided by the M.Ed. course professor.

5. What preparation and ongoing professional development activities does school-based clinical faculty receive to prepare them for roles as clinical supervisors?

All university supervisors, whether faculty or adjuncts, are provided an orientation meeting that clearly states the expectations of the supervisor, cooperating teacher, and teacher intern. The orientation provides guidelines for intern observations, conferencing, and assessment. The supervisors are provided Pathwise training if they have not previously had it. The supervisor is assigned a “buddy” if it is their first time supervising. The supervisors must have had experience and certification in the area in which they supervise. Supervisors who hold or previously held superintendent certificates may supervise in any area but are usually assigned to the area where their original certificate was issued. In addition, both the building agreement and the cooperating teacher agreement clearly define the expectations of the candidate, cooperating teacher, supervisor, and building principal.

The clinical supervision of licensed teachers completing the M.Ed. program will be provided by the professor who teaches the M.Ed. course that requires clinical action research as part of the course requirements. Those M.Ed. candidates who are not currently teaching is expected to secure a clinical/field experience in a P-12 school where they can complete the specified M.Ed. course assignment.

6. What evidence demonstrates that clinical faculty provides regular and continuous support for student teachers, licensed teachers completing graduate programs, and other school professionals?

Clinical faculty serve as cooperating teachers for candidates completing field experience and clinical practices. All clinical faculty serving in this capacity are required to provide feedback, support, and evaluation of the candidates they mentor. All clinical and field experience faculty provide feedback for the candidates by completing the formative, summative, and Chipper assessments. The consistent use of these forms at all levels provides both consistency and inter-reliability. The formative aspect of both the field and clinical assessments provides early intervention as well as time for correction should it be needed. Feedback during clinical practice is required and provided through the numerous observations and conferences that are conducted by the university supervisor(s) throughout the clinical experience.

The clinical supervision of licensed teachers completing the M.Ed. program is provided by the candidates' M.Ed. professor. Those M.Ed. candidates who are not currently teaching are expected to secure a clinical/field experience in a P-12 school where they can complete the specified M.Ed. course assignment under the supervision of the M.Ed. course professor. The action research completed by the advanced candidates as supervised and assessed by the M.Ed. professor has indicated that our advanced candidates have contributed much to the effectiveness of their particular classroom and school. Surveys completed by the administrators of our M.Ed. graduates confirms this as well.

7. What differences, if any, exist in the design, implementation, and evaluation of field experiences and clinical practice for programs for other school professionals, off-campus programs, and distance learning programs?

There are no programs for other school professionals, off-campus, or distance learning that currently exist.

8. (Optional) One or more tables and links to key exhibits related to the development and demonstration of knowledge, skills, and professional dispositions in field experiences and clinical practice could be attached here. Data in tables should be discussed in the appropriate prompt of 3b. (Links with descriptions must be typed into a Word document that can be uploaded here. The number of attached exhibits should be limited in number; BOE members should access most of the exhibits in the unit's electronic exhibit room.)