Apologetics Category Archives

COVID-19: A Coronavirus Primer

March 13, 2020

You’ve no doubt heard a lot of information about the Coronavirus (COVID-19) through the media, some of which is correct and some that is not.

Zach Jenkins, Pharm.D., BCPS, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Cedarville University School of Pharmacy, an infectious disease expert, provides the latest, factual COVID-19 information so you can make informed decisions on the health and safety of yourself and your family. You'll learn how COVID-19 originated, how it can be treated, how we can slow its growth, and much more,

Watch Dr. Jenkins' Primer

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Posted in Apologetics

Is Christianity Incompatible With Science?

June 11, 2019

Science and religion are like oil and water — they just don’t mix. You have to choose: You can either love God or love science, right? Wrong. That's what skeptics want you to believe, but we don’t have to choose between our faith and science. Dr. Dan DeWitt, Associate Professor of Applied Theology, shares 6 reasons why Christianity is not only compatible with science, it is foundational.

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Posted in Apologetics MMin

What Is the Ontological Argument?

June 4, 2019

There are many arguments for the existence of God. Perhaps one of the most famous — and most often misunderstood — is the ontological argument. Dr. J.R. Gilhooly, Assistant Professor of Theology at Cedarville University, explains this argument in the video below.

Unlike most arguments that start with an observation about the world and work back to a Creator, the ontological argument starts with the idea that based on the meaning of the word “God,” there has to be a God. There are many ways to make this argument but the simplest way is this: If it’s possible that God exists, then God exists.

As Christians, we should know and understand that there are good, sound arguments for God’s existence and be prepared to explain them to our skeptical friends.

Watch the video below for more with Dr. Gilhooly.

Posted in Apologetics MMin

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